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The Anti-Slavery Movement in Black and White with Jeanne Schultz Angel

Sat Jul 16 14:30:00 2016

The Anti-Slavery Movement in Black and White with Jeanne Schultz Angel

The Museum is pleased to welcome Jeanne Schultz Angel, historian and executive director of the Nineteenth Century Charitable Association in Oak Park, IL., who will present a program on the role Illinois and Illinoisans played in the anti-slavery movement preceding the Civil War, on Saturday, July 16 at 2:30 p.m. during the annual Lincoln’s Festival in Bloomington. This program will be held in the Museum’s Governor Fifer Courtroom and is free and open to the public.

Illinois and Illinoisans played prominent roles in the anti-slavery movement preceding the Civil War, but were all opponents of slavery necessarily involved in the Underground Railroad?Understanding the wide variety of motivations that might lie behind any given individual’s opposition to slavery – commitment to human rights, belief in racial equality, economic considerations, and religious convictions, among others – is important to understanding the escalation to war.

Ms. Angel’s program will explore the role that the Underground Railroad played in the lives of Freedom Seekers and explain how one particular story illustrates connections within the network across the state.She will examine the criteria that historians use to separate fact from fiction and determine which purported Underground Railroad sites are verifiable.Her program also will demonstrate that the range of responses to slavery on the part of Illinoisans was more complex than the state’s designation as the “Land of Lincoln” might suggest and that some of the underlying issues still manifest themselves in one form or another today.

Ms. Angel is a 2010 graduate of the prestigious Seminar for Historical Administration and the state representative for the American Association of State and Local History national awards program. She has a B.S. in Anthropology/English and a Masters in History from Illinois State University.Ms. Angel has worked in the museum field since 1994. She is currently the executive director of the Nineteenth Century Charitable Association in Oak Park, IL. and is a member of the Illinois Humanities Council’s “Road Scholars” program.

This program is made possible in part by a grant from Illinois Humanities, supported in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), and the Illinois General Assembly [through the Illinois Arts, a state agency], as well as by contributions from individuals, foundations, and corporations. For more information about this program, please contact the Education Department at education@mchistory.org or 309-827-0428.Free parking will be available at the Lincoln Parking Deck located one block south of the Museum on Front Street.