Dwight E. Frink
Collection



Processed by
Bill Kemp and
Brigid R. McBride



Table of Contents
The home of Dwight E. Frink and his wife Cora. This photo was taken in 1889, but the Frinks did not live there until 1899. The home was previously owned by George Brand.
 

 
Collection Information
Volume of Collection:
One Box
Collection Dates:
1905-1919
Restrictions:
None
Reproduction Rights:
Permission to reproduce or publish material in this collection must be obtained in writing from the McLean County Museum of History.
Alternative Formats:
None
Other Finding Aids: None
Location: Archives
Notes:
None

 

 

Historical Sketch

  Dwight E. Frink was born in Bloomington February 16, 1874. He was educated in the ward schools of Bloomington and Illinois Wesleyan University. He was a capable artist and cartoonist. Frink was a reporter for the Daily Bulletin, a long defunct Bloomington newspaper, for ten years. He was elected chief clerk of the city Election Commission and secretary for the McLean County Historical Society. He drew the plans for the soldiers' memorial monument at Miller Park.

  He married Cora Brand February 20, 1898, and had one daughter, Helen. He died January 18, 1919 of an illness, probably consumption.

 
Scope and Contents Note

  The collection contains biographical information about Dwight E. Frink and essays he authored concerning important McLean County residents.

 

Box and Folder Inventory

Folder 1:
Frink Biographical Information
1.1
Dwight E. Frink statistics
1.2
List of Pantagraph articles
1.3
"Dwight E. Frink Dies After Long Struggle," Pantagraph, January 20, 1919, c. 3-4
1.4
"Historical Society Honors Dwight Frink," Pantagraph, June 9, 1919, c. 1-2
1.5
"Memorial Resolutions," photocopy for Historical Society, no date
1.6
"Memorial Resolutions," original for Historical Society, no date

 

Folder 2:
Allin, James
2.1
"Men Affairs in Early Bloomington, Hon. James Allin," from the Sunday Bulletin, Dec. 17, 1905; 1 photocopy (6 pgs.) and 1 typescript (6 pgs)
In the spring of 1830, James Allin built the first house in what would soon become the City of Bloomington. Later that year he petitioned the state legislature to create the County of McLean for which he donated twenty-two and a half acres for the county seat. He served twice as state senator. He also served on the first Board of Trustees for Illinois Wesleyan. James Allin is remembered as the "father" of Bloomington and one of the founders of McLean County.

 

Folder 3:
Baker, Dr. Isaac
3.1
"Dr. Isaac Baker," from the Sunday Bulletin, May 12, 1906; 2 photocopies (9 pgs), 1 typescript (9 pgs.)
Dr. Isaac Baker was born in 1783 in Connecticut. He spent several years in Ohio and in the East. He eventually located in Blooming Grove and help lay out the roads and lots in Bloomington.

 

Folder 4:
Bunn, Lewis
4.1
"Lewis Bunn," taken from the Daily Bulletin, January 14, 1906; 1 photocopy (6 pgs.), 1 typescript (6 pgs.)
Lewis Bunn was born in Ohio in 1905. He married in 1831, and then opened a blacksmith shop in Bloomington. Bunn also employed Abraham Brokaw before Brokaw earned his wealth in the plow business.

 

Folder 5:
Burnham, J.H.
5.1
Form containing information about Capt. John Howard Burnham,
5.2
"J.H. Burnham," handwritten on letterhead
5.3
Form containing information about Capt. John Howard Burnham, handwritten original
Captain John Burnham was born in 1834 and arrived in Illinois in 1855. He received a scholarship to attend Illinois State Normal University and graduated in 1861. He enlisted in Company A of the Thirty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He resigned due to health issues and returned to Bloomington. He was elected superintendent of Bloomington schools for two years. He resigned after one year and became editor of The Pantagraph newspaper, a position he held for about three years. Captain John Burnham eventually became a contracting agent for the King Bridge Company of Cleveland, Ohio. After thirty-five years, he went into the bridge construction business with his brothers-in-law. This company was known as Burnham and Ives. He was a founding member of the McLean County Historical Society.

 

Folder 6:
Cromwell, Dr. William H.
6.1
"Dr. Wm. H. Cromwell," April 22, 1906; 1 photocopy (3 pgs.), 3 typescripts (3 pgs.)
Dr. William H. Cromwell was born in Maryland in 1811 and was educated as a doctor at the Baltimore Medical College. He moved to Illinois in 1823 and married Caroline Enos 1849. Cromwell was postmaster general, a doctor in the Civil War, and practiced privately. His family is responsible for laying out the town of Pekin, Illinois.

 

Folder 7:
Evans, William
7.1
"Wm. Evans," June 2, 1907; 1 photocopy (3 pgs.), 3 typescripts (3 pgs.)
William Evans was born in 1775 in Pennsylvania. Evans moved to Illinois and set up a farmstead. Eventually, James Allin and Jesse Fell purchased his farm land and laid out the City of Bloomington.

 

Folder 8:
Ewing, John W.
8.1
"John W. Ewing, April 29, 1906," 3 typescripts (5 pgs.)
John Wallis Ewing was born in 1808 in North Carolina. He moved to Kentucky to farm and eventually worked his way into Illinois, moving to Bloomington in 1840. Ewing was a hotelier before purchasing a saw mill, working as a mechanic, and developing and producing metal tools. He was the proprietor of the National Hotel in downtown Bloomington, a frequent stop for Eighth Judicial Circuit lawyers, including Abraham Lincoln. Ewing had several renowned relatives including former vice president Adlai Ewing Stevenson.

 

Folder 9:
Flagg, William R.
9.1
"Wm. F. Flagg, January 28, 1906," 2 photocopies of newspaper clipping (4 pgs.)
William Flagg was responsible of building area courthouses including the first brick courthouse in McLean County. Flagg also was a business partner with John Ewing. Together they purchased a saw mill on the south end of Bloomington and produced iron tools and farm equipment.

 

Folder 10:
Goodheart, William R.
10.1
"Bloomingtonian for 74 Years is James Goodheart," Sunday Bulletin, April 1, 1906, original newspaper glued to scrapbook page, 2 pieces and photocopy of item (2 pgs.)
10.2
"William Richard Goodheart, May 6, 1906," 1 photocopy (6 pgs.), 3 typescripts (6 pgs.)
William Goodheart and his family headed to Illinois in 1824. They first settled along the Mackinaw River, only to relocate to Blooming Grove and then Old Town Timber.

 

Folder 11:
Hanna, William H.
11.1
"Wm. H. Hanna, March 25, 1906," 1 photocopy (7 pgs.), 3 typescripts (7 pgs.)
William Hanna was born in Indiana and moved to Bloomington with his brothers in 1849. He practiced law with George P. Davis, the son of David Davis. Hanna was set to be elected to the Illinois Supreme Court, but declined the nomination. He was struck and killed by lightning in his home in 1870.

 

Folder 12:
Hawks, Matthew H.
12.1
"Matthew Huston Hawks, Feb. 25, 1906," 1 photocopy (6 pgs.), 1 typescript (6 pgs.)
12.2
"The Inevitable End," Daily Bulletin, March 11, 1882, p. 4, c. 3
Matthew Hawks was born in Kentucky in 1804. He trained as a tailor in the garment industry. When he came to Bloomington around 1835, he worked with his father in law. He developed and manufactured linseed oil which was transported to Chicago and St. Louis. Hawks was also a justice of the peace.

 

Folder 13:
Henry, Dr. John F.
13.1
"Dr. John F. Henry, May 20, 1906," 1 photocopy (7 pgs.), 3 typescripts (7 pgs.)
Dr. John Henry was a surgeon for the Twenty Eighth Regiment-Infantry during the War of 1812. After his service, he attended Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He went into private practice in Missouri, became a professor, then moved to Bloomington in 1833. He built an office, home, and stable on the north side of the Courthouse Square in Bloomington. He eventually moved on to Iowa to continue his private practice.

 

Folder 14:
Hobbs, William C.
14.1
"Dr. Wm. C. Hobbs, March 18, 1906," 1 photocopy (7 pgs.), 3 typescripts (7 pgs.)
William Hobbs was born around 1791 in Maryland. He moved to Bloomington around 1838. He set up a dentist office, but realized that pioneer settlers had little use for dentistry. He closed his office and began a school for pioneer children. He never married.

 

Folder 15:
Magoun, John T.
15.1
"John T. Magoun, February 11, 1906," 1 photocopy (8 pgs.), 1 typescript (8 pgs.)
John Magoun was born in 1806 in Massachusetts. Magoun started for Illinois in 1835 and arrived in Bloomington in 1836. Magoun was a mason by trade. He was a lifelong bachelor and donated much of his money to benevolent causes.

 

Folder 16:
Major, William T.
16.1
"William Trabue Major, March 4, 1906," 1 photocopy (5 pgs.), 2 typescripts (5 pgs.)
In 1835, William T. Major and his family moved to Illinois from Kentucky. He quickly became a busy and prominent citizen of McLean County. He founded the First Christian Church in his home in 1839. Major was progressive in his views on education, especially for girls. He started Major's Seminary to provide an education for the young women of McLean County.

 

Folder 17:
McCullough, Col. William
17.1
"Col. William McCullough, February 4, 1906," 1 photograph (5 pgs.), 1 typescript (5 pgs.)
Lt. Col. William McCullough was born in Kentucky and came to Illinois with his family in 1826. At age 21, he enlisted to fight in the Black Hawk War and distinguished himself for bravery. Although he lost his arm in a threshing machine accident, he held the offices of sheriff and circuit clerk of McLean County. Despite having one arm and a defective eye, McCullough sought special permission from President Lincoln and joined the Fourth Illinois Cavalry.

 

Folder 18:
Miller, James
18.1
"Men of Affairs in Early Bloomington, Hon. James Miller, from the Bulletin Dec. 24, 1905," 1 photocopy (9 pgs.), 1 typescript (9 pgs.)
James Miller was born in Virginia in 1795. He came to Illinois in 1833. Miller purchased large amounts of land in Bloomington including areas in the town square and what would become Miller Park, Bloomington's largest. He also partnered with Asahel Gridley and Isaac Funk in running a general store.

 

Folder 19:
Orme, William W.
19.1
"Gen. William W. Orme, April 1, 1906," 1 photocopy (4 pgs.), 2 typescripts (4 pgs.)
William Ward Orme was born in 1832 in Washington, DC. He learned to be a cabinetmaker, worked as a bank messenger and studied law. In 1850, Orme came to Bloomington. He practiced law and was associated with Abraham Lincoln, and David Davis. During the Civil War, Orme was instrumental in the formation of McLean County's Ninety Fourth Volunteer Infantry Regiment. He served as colonel and was promoted to general. He suffered illnesses (later identified as tuberculosis) and was forced to resign from the Army. Orme took command of the prison Camp Douglas in Chicago. He was appointed to the supervising special agent of the Treasury Department at Memphis, Tennessee. His poor health forced him to resign from his duties. He died in Bloomington in 1866.

 

Folder 20:
Osborn, Harmon
20.1
"Harmon Osborn," 1 photocopy (1 pg.)
20.2
"Harmon Osborn," 1 typescript (1 pg.)
Harmon Osborn was born in 1813 in New York. He had previously settled in LeRoy and moved to Bloomington in 1836. He owned an oil mill which caught fire. Osborn died in 1854.

 

Folder 21:
Parke, Dr. Charles Ross
21.1
"Charles Ross Parke, M.D.," by Dwight E. Frink, 1 photocopy (14 pgs.), 1 typescript (14 pgs.)
Dr. Charles Ross Parke was born in Pennsylvania in 1823. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia in 1847. He went to California during the Gold Rush, and was a surgeon in the Crimean War and the U.S. Civil War. In 1852, Dr. Parke arrived in Bloomington where he opened a private practice.

 

Folder 22:
Potter, Bradford S.
22.1
"Potters Leave for Chicago, Oct. 1, 1906," 2 typescripts (5 pgs.)
Potter was born in New York in 1836. He was educated at Genesee College in New York which later became Syracuse University. Potter authored school text books in history. He taught at Illinois Wesleyan University in 1895 and was elected to the Board of Education.

 

Folder 23:
Rogers, Elihu
23.1
"Elihu Rogers, May 27, 1906," 3 typescripts (3 pgs.)
Elihu Rogers was born in New York in 1805. He came to Illinois in 1844. He started in the lumber business in McLean County and also purchased vast amounts of land. His lumber mill was burned in 1864. He then purchased a mill in Normal. He retired a few years before his death in 1872.

 

Folder 24:
Rogers, Dr. Thomas P.
24.1
"Dr. Thomas P. Rogers, Bulletin, February 18, 1906," 1 photocopy (6 pgs.), 1 typescript (6 pgs.)
Dr. Thomas Rogers was born in Ohio in 1812. He was educated in that state as a physician. He later moved to Decatur before moving to Bloomington. He was associated with Abraham Lincoln, Jesse Fell, and other famous McLean County residents. He died in 1899.

 

Folder 25:
Smith, Giles
25.1
"Giles A. Smith, Bulletin April 8, 1906," 1 photocopy (7 pgs.), 2 typescripts (7 pgs
25.2
"Men of Affairs in Early Bloomington," photocopy (1 pg), 2 typescripts (1 pg)
Giles Smith was born in 1829 in New York. He was educated as a business student, but ended up serving in the military. He and his wife moved from Ohio to Bloomington. Smith opened a dry goods store and also operated several hotels in Bloomington before serving in the military. He died in 1873.

 

Folder 26:
Temple, William H.
26.1
"Wm. H. Temple, April 15, 1906," 3 typescripts (4 pgs.)
William Temple arrived in Bloomington in 1835. He was known as a fair and reasonably wealthy businessman. He retired in 1871 when some financial distress hit his business. He died in 1889.

 

Folder 27:
Thomas, William
27.1
"Men of Affairs in Early Bloomington, William Thomas, Taken from the Sunday Bulletin, Dec. 31, 1905," 1 photocopy (6 pgs), 1 typescript (6 pgs)
27.2
"Another Old Resident Called Away," Pantagraph, April 22, 1881, p. 4, c. 6
27.3
"Gone To Rest," Bulletin, April 12, 1881, p. 1, c. 6
William Thomas was born in Ohio in 1806. He moved to Bloomington around 1837. He rented farm land from the Durley Family. He was unanimously elected as County Treasurer for ten years. He died in 1881.

 

Folder 28:
Washburn, Amasa C.
28.1
"Men of Affairs in Early Bloomington, Amasa C. Washburn, Taken from the Sunday Bulletin, Jan. 7, 1906," 1 photocopy (7 pgs.), 1 typescript (7 pgs.)
Amasa Washburn was born in 1807 in Vermont. Washburn was a religious figure and he taught the first Sunday School class in McLean County. He was a charter member of the First Presbyterian Church which was organized in 1832. He organized the first temperance society in McLean County and held strong anti-slavery views.

 

Folder 29:
Withers, Allen
29.1
"Allen Withers, Sunday Bulletin, March 11, 1906," 3 typescripts (7 pgs.)
Allen Withers was born on a farm in Jessamine County, Kentucky on January 21, 1807. He moved to the Southwest and learned Spanish and a Native American dialect. He then moved to Bloomington in 1834 and took a job as a clerk in a general store. He married Sarah Withers in 1836 and the couple lived in Bloomington. They relocated briefly to Missouri and then back to Bloomington. Withers briefly owned another general store with William H. Temple, briefly owned a hardware store, then purchased 320 acres a few miles south of Bloomington where he raised livestock and farmed for the remainder of his life. Withers had sympathies for the southern states during the Civil War and opposed Abraham Lincoln during his campaigns. Eventually, Withers became a Union supporter because he did not want to alienate business partners and friends. Withers died in 1864 and is buried at Evergreen Memorial Cemetery in Bloomington.

 

Folder 30:
Benjamin Eulogy
30.1
Intimacies of the Late R.M. Benjamin," by Dwight E. Frink, 1 photocopy (9 pgs.), 1 typescript (9 pgs.)
 

Reuben Moore Benjamin was born in June of 1833 in New York. Benjamin graduated from Amherst and attended Harvard Law School. He came to Bloomington in 1856 and practiced law with Asahel Gridley. Abraham Lincoln served as a member of his examination committee and signed his qualifications to practice law in Illinois.

Benjamin served in the Union Army for several months during the Civil War and became a member of the constitutional convention to redraft the Illinois Constitution in 1870. Benjamin was elected Judge of the County Court of McLean County and served several terms. He also co-founded the Bloomington Law School at Illinois Wesleyan University and was Dean for several years. Upon retiring from the practice of law in 1893, he focused on writing and teaching.

Benjamin was known as a populist lawyer fighting for regulation of monopolies and trusts. He took the Chicago and Alton Railroad to court for unfair fees for hauling lumber. Even though Benjamin was a radical, he strictly adhered to the Republican Party's ideals. He was described as a "pioneer antimonopolist" and at the same time a "radical opponent" of socialism.

He married Laura Woodin from Chatham, New York in 1856. The resided at 510 E. Grove St. in Bloomington where he remained until his death in 1917.

 

Folder 31:
First White Child
31.1
"McLean County's First White Child, and an Early Prediction of McLean County's Agricultural Greatness," read at the 25th Annual Meeting of the McLean County historical Society, March 3, 1917, by Dwight E. Frink, 1 photocopy (1 pg)
31.2
"Interesting facts about McLean County brought out at a meeting of the Tazwell County Historical Society, at Pekin November 22, 1916," by D. E. Frink, (6 pgs.)
31.3
"McLean County's First White Child, and an Early Prediction of McLean County's Agricultural Greatness," read at the 25th Annual Meeting of the McLean County historical Society, March 3, 1917, by Dwight E. Frink, 1 typescript (1 pg)
31.4
Draft of "Interesting facts about McLean County brought out at a meeting of the Tazwell County Historical Society, at Pekin November 22, 1916," by D. E. Frink, includes handwritten notations, (5 pgs.)
31.5
"McLean County's First White Child and an Early Predition of McLean County's Agricultural Greatness," read at the 25th Annual Meeting of the McLean County historical Society, March 3, 1917, by Dwight E. Frink, 1 photocopy (5 pgs.), 1 typescript (5 pgs.)

 

Folder 32:
Lincoln in Bloomington
32.1
"Local Recollections of Abraham Lincoln - Early History of Bloomington Influenced by the Rail Splitter," from personal interviews with men who knew Lincoln, 1907, 2 typescripts (14 pgs.), 1 photocopy (14 pgs.)

 

Folder 33:
Metamorphosis of Bloomington
33.1
"Metamorphosis of Bloomington," by Dwight E. Frink, 1 photocopy (19 pgs.)
33.2
"Addition to paper on Transformation of Bloomington," photocopy (1 pg)
33.3
Handwritten list of prominent Bloomington citizens
33.4
"The Metamorphosis of Bloomington," by Dwight E. Frink (19 pgs.) and "Addition to paper on Transformation of Bloomington," original items (20 pgs.)

 

Folder 34:
Stages and Stage Lines
34.1
"Stages and Stage Lines in McLean County and Illinois," by Dwight E. Frink, 1 photocopy (11 pgs.), 1 typescript original (11 pgs.)

 

Folder 35:
To Children/McLean County
35.1
"To The Children of the City of Bloomington," by Dwight E. Frink, 1 photocopy (3 pgs.), 1 handwritten original (4 pgs.)

 

McLean County Museum of History Collections and Research