200 North Main Street | Bloomington, Illinois | 309-827-0428

#Entertainment

Written by Bill Kemp in

Photo of the Week, 76: Stars Come Out for War Bond Luncheon

On September 24, 1942, four visiting entertainers were the main attraction at a “Star Victory” luncheon at the Bloomington Consistory (now the Center for Performing Arts)...

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Written by Bill Kemp in WGLT McHistory Series

McHistory: Bloomington Dramaturge Explored Gender Roles

Rachel Crothers is all but unknown today as America's most successful female playwright.

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Written by Tod Eagleton in Collection Highlights

We All Scream for Ice Cream

Batemans Restaurant & Ice Cream Saloon, 1873, Bloomington Illinois

How long exactly have people been screaming for ice cream? No one really knows for sure; but, I do know that nothing beats the taste of homemade ice cream!

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Written by Tod Eagleton in Collection Highlights

Soap Box Derby Dreams

The M.E. Doyle Trophy was presented to Eugene Millard after becoming City Champion of the Bloomington Soap Box Derby on July 22, 1937.

The M.E. Doyle Trophy was presented to Eugene Millard after becoming City Champion of the Bloomington Soap Box Derby on July 22, 1937. Millard would go on to win the Central Illinois title and compete at Derby Downs in Akron, Ohio.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 59: Bloomington’s Paul Rhymer and the Golden Age of Radio

From 1932 to the mid-1940s, Paul Rhymer's “Vic and Sade" was one of the more popular and critically acclaimed afternoon radio shows in all America. Rhymer (1905-1964) grew up in Bloomington, attended Illinois Wesleyan University, and wrote for The Pantagraph before moving to Chicago and enjoying tremendous success in the radio business.

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Written by Susan Hartzold in Collection Highlights

Prohibition doll unique item from 1920s

The Museum owns a very unique method used to transport illegal hooch; a prohibition doll.

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Written by Susan Hartzold in Collection Highlights

What the heck is Julia LeBeau playing?

Miss LeBeau’s tin can xylophone was donated to the Museum in 1994 by her good friend Charles Ridenour who believedit needed an appropriate home.We agreed!

Julia LeBeau (1903-1994) was the daughter of George and Nettie LeBeau, owners of a Bloomington music shop. In 1906 she decided she wanted a xylophone, but her father didn't want to spend the money — he didn't think she'd stick with it. Instead, he built this tin-can xylophone for her, using fruit, fish, and vegetable cans purchased from a downtown Bloomington grocery.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 48: Skimming On Steel at Miller Park

Ice skating proved so popular in the early decades of the twentieth century that from time to time Bloomington officials established additional skating venues.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Collection Highlights

Big Dance in Colfax—100 years ago!

Museum volunteer Amy Miller recently donated a sizable collection of dance cards and other local ephemera* including this October 4, 1913 flier for a dance at Colfax's Central Opera House.

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Written by Bill Kemp in Historic Photos

Photo of the Week, 38: Boo!

Photo of the Week, 38: Boo!

Not much is known about this curious photograph other than what's offered in the handwritten caption.

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